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Court Expectations

Court can be a scary place for first time offenders, the outcome of the verdict can be much better if you know how to prepare yourself.


When you’re in the courtroom

Important Aspects

The Dress Code

In the real world, the way you dress is a direct reflection of your person, and this is only emphasized in a court of law. In order for the judge to take you seriously, you must show him that you are professional and courteous. In a typical courtroom, if you are wearing shorts and flip flops, you will be turned away and not allowed to enter. Bring a collared shirt and dress pants and do not wear flashy clothes.

Come Prepared

Preparing in a court room is key, especially if you’re representing yourself because it can be the determining factor on whether or not the judge will side with you or the prosecution.

Be Respectful

In a courtroom, it’s very easy to get irritated based on the testimony of the prosecution, but in order to maintain professionalism and to avoid being in contempt of court, it’s very important to keep your cool and wait until the judge grants you with the right to explain your side of the story.

Follow All Directions

Lack of following directions is quite possibly the worst possible thing you can do in a court of law. This will make you look bad in front of the judge and therefore reduce your chances of winning your case. The judge can also impose a charge on you for contempt of court.

Who will be there?

The Defense Team

The defense team will comprise of the defendant (you), and your attorney (if you’ve hired one).

The Prosecuting Team

The prosecuting team comprises of the prosecutor who is in charge, and the police officer who is the star witness.

The Judge

The judge is essentially the one in charge of acting as a referee. The judge has the final say over any and all objections, fines, and final verdicts.

The Typical Court Employees

The typical court employees in the courtroom will include the bailiff who acts as the officer and sergeant of arms in the courtroom. They will also include the the court clerk that will act as the assistant to the judge.


Q: What will the prosecution’s case be?

A: If you’ve contested your citation and it has gotten far enough to a point where you’re sitting in a courtroom, the main goal of the prosecution is to prove your guilt beyond a reasonable doubt. This means that the prosecution must provide any evidence of guilt such as the direct radar and LiDAR examples as well as the testimonial of the law enforcement officer who issued you your citation. And you must provide adequate defense to disprove their case.

 


Objections

The main purpose of objections during your trial is to deter the opposing team (the prosecution) by affecting their flow and train of evidence. All potential items that could be objected to, should be objected to. Be sure to write down and take notes of all the evidences that are brought forth by the prosecution as you will be able to use those during your cross-examination.

Common Objections

Lack of Foundation

An objection for lack of foundation is used on the premise that the opposing party brings forth a question for a witness that is impossible for the witness to truly know.

Conclusion

An objection for conclusion is used on the premise that the officer must make a direct conclusion based on an insufficient number of facts after a request from the prosecution.

Hearsay

An objection for hearsay is used on the premise that anyone in the courtroom cannot use the testimony of any person not present inside the courtroom. Meaning that an officer cannot bring forth that a witness saw the violation occur if that witness isn’t present in the courtroom during the testimony.

Irrelevant

An objection for irrelevance is used on the premise that the officer could be disuscssing an aspect or circumstance of the citation that has no direct effect to the law that you are accused of breaking.


Q: What is a cross examination?

A: The cross examination period is that in which the interrogation of a witness called by one’s opponent. The main purposes of cross-examination are to elicit favorable facts from the witness, or to impeach the credibility of the testifying witness to lessen the weight of unfavorable testimony.

 


Motions

The main purpose of motions is to move forward to the next potential step in the trial. Typically, a motion will be used in a courtroom in order to dismiss the case for multiple potential reasons.

Common Motions

Dismiss

An objection for lack of foundation is used on the premise that the opposing party brings forth a question for a witness that is impossible for the witness to truly know.

Dismiss Due to Insufficient Evidence

An objection for conclusion is used on the premise that the officer must make a direct conclusion based on an insufficient number of facts after a request from the prosecution.

Dismiss Due to Incompetent Witness

An objection for hearsay is used on the premise that anyone in the courtroom cannot use the testimony of any person not present inside the courtroom. Meaning that an officer cannot bring forth that a witness saw the violation occur if that witness isn’t present in the courtroom during the testimony.


Attorney Locator Map

At Driver Defense, we wanted to bring users maximum ease when searching for an attorney. Our Find-A-Lawyer map allows you to locate all of our network attorneys in your area. You can find an attorney by either entering an address or by letting our system find your position. In order to view an attorney’s full profile, you must click on their name. Click here to see what the different color pins stand for.

 


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Questions? | Comments? | Concerns? Contact-us directly via our contact form or by calling and leaving us a message with your info at (530) 213-DFNS (3367).

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